Plastic Freedom

Plastic Freedom: Toothbrush

Sticking with the theme of metal health, the second regularly purchased (and thrown away) plastic item is my toothbrush. I actually have been using Quip for a few years, but I have novel loved the plastic replacement heads and packaging it comes in. I decided to try out Goodwell’s premium toothbrush that also includes a subscription model and replaceable brush heads, but their heads are actually biodegradable!

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Alternative Products

  1. Bamboo toothbrushes with biodegradable bristles like Goodwell’s.

  2. Brushes made from biodegradable plastic alternative materials or recycled (and re-recyclable) materials.

  3. Mechanical or electric toothbrushes with biodegradable replacement heads like Goodwell’s Be Brush (which required no electricity or charging!).

Plastic Freedom: Dental Floss and Flossers

I started my plastic freedom challenge with what I felt was my most wasteful single use plastic - dental flossers. I use at least one everyday and feel a pain of guilt thinking about the thousands that are sitting in a landfill from me alone. So I went on the hunt for plastic-free flosser and floss options and found three.

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Alternative Products

  1. Silk or bamboo floss sold in cardboard or glass. If you go with the glass jar you can purchase refills for it.

  2. Flossers made from biodegradable materials like cornstarch, charcoal or proprietary technology that have been tested (like Goodwell’s).

  3. A water pik (or flosser) which is made form plastic but not single-use. I also have heard of a water pik attachment for the shower.

100 Days to Plastic Freedom

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This year for my annual 100 day project I switched things up from my usual mindfulness challenge. I have been looking to reduce my waste and particularly use of single-use plastics, so I decided to use this as an opportunity to do so.

Each weekday I chose one single-use plastic item I but with some regularity and research alternative products that would produce no plastic waste, and minimal waste generally. I documented each of these in my Instagram stories, but for posterity I want to share that research here. I will call this series of posts my journey to “Plastic Freedom.”